20 common things I no longer own

My very first post here was about the things I no longer buy, and more recently I posted a list of things I only own one of. It feels only fitting that I keep with this pattern, and so welcome to my post on the things I no longer own! 

There are plenty of things that I could put on this list, having gradually but consciously reduced my possessions over the past 3 years. However, I have tried to keep the list to common items or “essentials” that I realised weren’t very essential to my needs.

I hope this list can provide some inspiration in your own decluttering journey, and help you to consider what you want most out of the possessions and items you keep in your life. 

1. A dining table

Photo by Max Vakhtbovych on Pexels.com

When we moved into our current apartment, we had all intentions of eventually buying a dining table. However, as we styled the space with our existing belongings and became quite comfortable with the negative space we had created for ourselves, we began to consider, perhaps we actually don’t need a dining table after all.

We have a lovely outdoor setting on our balcony which is great for hosting and meals in the summer, and we can otherwise eat at the kitchen counter or (carefully!) on the lounge. 

While I’m sure a dining table will become an essential later in life, at this point, it’s just not needed.

2. A coffee machine

Despite being a coffee fan, I don’t own a coffee maker. 

As I explain in my 5 things I still buy post, I enjoy the process and experience of occasionally purchasing coffee from a coffee shop.

I’m also not addicted to coffee (thankfully!), so I only do this once or twice a week, limiting any considerable impact on my overall budget and savings.

I’m actually worried that if I had a coffee machine, I’d soon become addicted!

3. Side tables

While I think these can look lovely, we have plenty of storage in the apartment already, and would rather have more negative space in our modest home than additional furniture pieces.  

4. Seasonal decorations 

This is something that may change when we have a child and want to embrace the excitement of holidays more, but at this point in life, I don’t really understand the appeal of keeping additional ornaments locked away for most of the year and bringing them out for just a month or so. 

But I suppose I also don’t really see the point of ornaments in general so this is probably a me thing!

5. A bike

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

While I am able to walk most places and drive the rest, I don’t need a bike. 

In a different city, I dreamt of selling my car and relying only on a bike (especially after living in Cambridge for a year, where I did own a bike!). Although Canberra is extremely bike friendly, it would be difficult to navigate without owning a car, too. I also often use my car to visit my family and friends in Sydney, so I can’t see myself making the switch soon.

6. Special dining/cutlery etc.

Growing up, I didn’t understand why my parents owned a collection of crockery, cutlery and glassware that we only used in exceptional circumstances. 

As a minimalist, I want to get the most purpose out of everything I own. This means using my dinnerware, even if they were received as a fancy gift (I’m looking at you, champagne flutes!).

7. A printer/scanner 

If I’m honest, sometimes this can be frustrating. 

However, 99.9% of the time it’s fine. I have access to a printer at work which I can use when I absolutely need to (the classic millennial move!), but I make a conscious effort to avoid printing and using paper as much as I can. Besides, many things that once required printing now don’t (e.g. plane tickets can be stored on your phone, many businesses and organisations now accept e-signatures).

8. Air fresheners 

I’m very sensitive to strong smells; they give me headaches! Therefore you will never see (or smell?) an air freshener in my home or car. I don’t mind subtle candles, though, so I tend to make an exception for these. 

9. Specialty cleaning products 

We have an all-purpose cleaner, a bleach product for mould, and a toilet cleaner. Other than this, we also always have vinegar and bicarb soda, the two unsung heroes (actually frequently sung on home & lifestyle blogs, but still, life savers!).

The combination of these three products and two household items seems to work a treat to keep our apartment clean.

One day I will evolve into my final form of frugality and use only common household items to make my own cleaning products, although I’m not quite there yet.

10. A top sheet

Photo by Burst on Pexels.com

Apparently it is a contentious debate as to whether a top sheet is a necessity. I am in the “no” team for this one. 

Sure, we have to wash the doona cover more often, but this isn’t a big deal. It’s so much easier and quicker to make the bed in the morning, and I also happen to think it’s much more comfortable!

11. Throw pillows

Similarly to seasonal decorations, this is a decor item that I don’t think has enough purpose for me to justify owning. I also grew up with about six massive pillows on my bed, so I think that experience turned me off forever! 

12. A belt

I tried to make belts work for a long time, always keeping at least one in my wardrobe just in case I needed it. But of course I never wore it, because I actually find belts extraordinarily uncomfortable. Once I came to terms with this fact, I have never bothered dabbling with the idea again.

13. Bracelets

I don’t own a lot of jewellery, and most of what I own I wear daily (earrings and two rings).  

I also own two necklaces that I will put on occasionally if I am going out and want to add a little something to my outfit. 

Bracelets, however, don’t really fit into either of these needs. I don’t like the feeling of something dangling on my wrist all day, and I would always choose a necklace to finish an outfit, so I no longer own any bracelets.

14. Hosiery 

Canberra is far too cold to wear skirts in winter, so I simply no longer need hosiery. Bye, hosiery!

15. Winter pyjamas

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Winter pyjamas are something that I definitely appreciate, and if I were to be gifted them, I would probably love. 

However, it’s hard to justify actually buying them when I have perfectly cosy leisurewear (trackpants/sweatpants and hoodies) available and ready. For this reason, I haven’t owned proper winter pyjamas for a while.

16. Hair products (anything besides shampoo and conditioner)

I used to buy masks, leave-in treatments, serums etc. Unfortunately, despite my best intentions, I never consistently used these products. 

I am lucky to have low maintenance hair (straight, thick, a little dry but nothing major) so I have decided to embrace this gift and limit unnecessary additions to my routine.   

17. Desktop computer

For personal purposes, my MacBook is more than sufficient, and I don’t see the need for a desktop computer as well. 

I appreciate a bigger screen for work (I do a lot of data analysis which fries my eyes), but even this is achieved through a laptop with connected monitors.

18. A camera

I don’t tend to own duplicates of expensive items, and for my purposes, the camera on my iPhone works wonderfully fine. 

19. A clock

Similarly, I use my phone as my alarm clock in the morning, as well as my usual source of time-telling.

Even beyond my phone, I doubt I would ever need a wall clock because my microwave and oven (like many common appliances) both show the time, too.

20. A calendar

Photo by Olya Kobruseva on Pexels.com

Aaaand just one last one plug for my phone, it also holds my calendar, which is synced with my work outlook calendar. This is the handiest way for me to keep on top of my schedule and make sure I don’t forget anything!

What’s a common item you no longer own, and realise you can manage perfectly fine without? 

Eden

5 thoughts on “20 common things I no longer own

Add yours

  1. It has to be jewellery and a wrist watch for me. Often I get comments from people about how surprising that is, but I couldn’t care less as long as it works for me.

    Liked by 1 person

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